Hans Zimmer

Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Adofo » February 20th, 2015, 11:57 pm

Like I said, this was composed by Badelt, but Zimmer changed it into what it is now! Whenever I hear this, it's stuck in my head for hours! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRh-dzrI4Z4
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Captain Cupcake » February 21st, 2015, 4:12 am

Actually, the history of who composed that theme is a little shaky. After Alan Silvestri's music was dropped due to Bruckheimer desiring a different kind of style of music, Hans Zimmer was the one originally intended to be the first choice to do the replacement score. However, he was contracted to do The Last Samurai at that time and couldn't be involved. Still, he wound up composing most of the motifs(including "He's a Pirate") and Badelt would finish up the project doing by a lot of the final arrangements, with Zimmer being left uncredited due to the aforementioned contract. So essentially, it was Zimmer's theme all along.

Other people were involved with the score and contributed cues of their own as well(Geoff Zanelli, one of those worker bees involved, is actually the one who did the final He's a Pirate arrangements). This is apparent as some material shares similarities with past Zimmer works, like that small theme for the Black Pearl's pirates(originally used back in Road to El Dorado which he co-composed with John Powell) and such.

What's funny is that "He's a Pirate" itself seems to have been a musical idea of Zimmer and his associates for some time before that, though. There was a very similar motif used in Lion King II's score by Nick Glennie-Smith(someone who often collaborates with Zimmer and also contributed some work on PotC), and Zimmer's work for Gladiator also had a theme with a similar melody. Then comes PotC and we hear it fully realized. It'd be interesting to see how far back that idea went and where it first started, although it'd probably be difficult to recognize in its earliest form.
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Iberian » April 26th, 2015, 4:55 pm

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Last edited by Iberian on October 10th, 2016, 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Elton John » May 24th, 2015, 8:34 am

One of the forums I go to is pretty devout when it comes to hating hans zimmer but even then most admit that his score for the first tlk is good.

Neogaf, one of the biggest enthusiast forums for gamers. It's also full of ... To put it lightly, people who are very critical of their entertainment.

http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1051023

Right in the first post 'kings of the past' is brought up.
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Captain Cupcake » May 24th, 2015, 8:53 am

I think most anti-Zimmer film score fans can agree that he his late '80s to early '00s works were usually pretty excellent.

The hate is mostly directed to his post-2004 scores, where he really started getting into a lot of minimalistic and ambient stuff, lacking as much depth as his melodic scores. Every now and again he'd go back to something more traditional, like when he composes/co-composes DreamWorks animated film scores as well as a gem in-between, but the more famous type of scoring he's known for today leaves a bitter taste in film music fan's mouths.

I think some disdain also stems from the fact that, due to working on a lot of projects at a time, he sometimes winds up mainly just writing some reoccurring themes to be used for a movie, and then has a group of ghost writers arrange and compose everything else.
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Elton John » June 20th, 2015, 12:08 am

I don't know how much of it was his but his kung fu panda score was good. I also liked his batman begins/man of steel/interstellar score.
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby zerodix » May 21st, 2016, 1:00 pm

i am going to hans zimmer in concert this tuesday, in Rotterdam! shall i take pics?
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Rollo » May 21st, 2016, 1:59 pm

The only work I ever enjoy of Zimmer's is for his animated movies, particularly the ones from before the 2000s. My favourite is The Lion King and I consider it to be his best work. Spirit: Stallion of the Cimmaron's score is also great. But as a whole, Zimmer tends to work best in groups. I don't believe that his score for TLK would've been as successful without the help of Lebo M. I know Jay Rifkin and Mark Mancina also played big roles (I think Mancina could've also been responsible for some of the magic; if you listen to his score for Brother Bear you'll notice how well he is at producing chants), but I really think it's Lebo M who makes the score what it is. It wouldn't be half as great without the African vocalisation that he provided and composed in his own way. Another example is Kung Fu Panda and The Road to El Dorado. Both movies have great scores with Zimmer featuring John Powell, and I'd place a solid bet that it was Powell who was bringing forth the real creativity, basing it off his other scores for movies like How To Train Your Dragon. Maybe Zimmer polishes it and gives it the final touches, but I doubt he's the one who's making those memorable themes, not nowadays anyway. I'd say he was overrated, but I have noticed most people are starting to realise how repetitive he can be.

It's funny, because recently I watched Radio Flyer, which Zimmer composed for. As I was watching it I noticed how similar the music in it is to Spirit's, particularly the track 'Homeland'. There's more than ten years separating those two movies. Maybe that lessened the blow a little, but it did show me how prone he was to repeating past cues in a way that it was really quite noticeable. In fact, the cue from Radio Flyer (I'm not sure what the name is) is almost identical to a certain cue in Homeland aside from the last two notes.

The same thing has happened with John Williams. I wasn't impressed with The Force Awakens nor was I impressed with War Horse. Gotta give the guy some credit considering his age, but I suspect his best years are over. Compare War Horse's soundtrack to Jurassic Park's...the latter is sheer brilliance.

I've always adored movie scores and as a kid I used to consider Zimmer my favourite composer, before I branched out and discovered tons of better composers, like Alan Silvestri (his score for The Polar Express is breathtaking), James Newton Howard, James Horner (Balto was his best imo), Jerry Goldsmith, Trevor Jones, who composed the score for The Dark Crystal, which is out of this world and one of my favourite scores ever. Hell, even 'smaller' composers like John Debney are worth a listen, especially his score for the new Jungle Book (not so small anymore.) Another recent contender is Michael Giacchino, whose score for Zootopia has joined the list as one of my all-time favourites.

With most composers I often find that you can't guarantee they'll bring out a great score no matter how talented they are. It's the same for directors, really. The material they're working with has to bring out that spark. Sometimes pieces of media are so bland that you can't fault them for not managing to create their usual magic--though I'm always delighted when movies are improved by their scores. The Lion King 1 1/2 is an example. I have most of the score by Don Harper, and there's several amazing cues throughout it. I'd definitely recommend it. It's very sweet.
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Captain Cupcake » May 21st, 2016, 3:42 pm

lelizwe wrote:(I think Mancina could've also been responsible for some of the magic; if you listen to his score for Brother Bear you'll notice how well he is at producing chants)


It's a bit hard to find more evidence of much ghostwriting other than vague "additional music" being credited to some of the contributors of the score, but if I recall correctly from Hans-Zimmer.com, someone said that Mancina was the one who did the "Simba, It's To Die For" and "Nala, Is It Really You?" cues.

I wouldn't be surprised if that was true, given that it's a more quirky-oriented befitting of his sort of material, and the grandiose action segment of the cue that plays when Nala chases Pumbaa and fights Simba does sound a bit more distinctive compared to other "epic" segments within the score. Even though Zimmer didn't truly establish his particular sound until some time later, you can definitely tell it's his handiwork in some of the other action material, but that fight music has a different feel to it. It fits in pretty seamlessly overall, though, especially when you hear him arrange some of Zimmer's motifs in there to thematically tie it all together.

I think the same post that stated all that also mentioned that Nick Glennie-Smith did some arranging in "Didn't Your Mother Tell You Not To Play With Your Food" and the second half of "Hyenas in the Pride Lands."
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Re: Hans Zimmer

Postby Rollo » May 21st, 2016, 4:46 pm

The second half of "Hyenas in the Pride Lands" being the Busa segment? That's interesting. That actually makes me quite happy because I always thought that segment sounded a lot like Kiara's theme from Simba's Pride. It makes sense now, if Nick was responsible.
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