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Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 25th, 2015, 7:28 pm
by BrianGriffinFan
When he's a kid he calls Mufasa "dad" and Scar "uncle Scar", as most people would.
.but as an adult calls them "father" and "Scar"...what? He was relatable and casual as a kid but suddenly acts different as an adult. Plus he's so angry...like he says "gimme one reason that I shouldn't rip you to pieces" to Scar first thing when he sees him again, BEFORE learning the truth.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 25th, 2015, 8:17 pm
by Elton John
He grew up naive and went through a highly traumatic experience where he believed it was his fault... Sobering him up quite a bit... Even though he was living a 'so-called' worry free lifestyle he was still tormented over it.

Also people tend to get more serious as they grow up. I guess it even effects lions.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 25th, 2015, 8:46 pm
by BrianGriffinFan
But would that be the cause of the specific points I made?

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 5:21 am
by Gaze
yeah, Elton John's response about sums it up. Simba's maturation in TLK makes perfect sense to me. and of course he'd want to rip Scar apart - he'd just witnessed Scar smacking his mother to the ground, not to mention the terrible state of the Pridelands. knowing that all the lionesses he'd grown up with were starving thanks to Scar and then actually seeing him physically harm Sarabi should be all the reason Simba needs to want to destroy Scar right there on the spot.

I have, however, been wondering what happened to make Simba's personality change so harshly in Simba's Pride and The Lion Guard. he is notably more stern and serious in both these sequels. of course his experiences in the original film would sober him up, but he still seemed kinder and more carefree. plus I imagine he wouldn't warm up very quickly to being a strict, well-disciplined ruler after years of living 'hakuna matata'-style in the jungle.

perhaps his no-nonsense attitude is a means of compensating for all that time spent with Timon and Pumbaa, takin it easy. I just wish we had a little more insight on what happened in between TLK and SP.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 7:26 am
by Carl
It's also possible, Sadiki, in reference to the SP and TLG part, that the stress got to him. Loads of people who are normally laid back and chill can become very strict when given responsibilities like children that they aren't prepared for.

As for the way Simba behaved at the end of the first film, as that's the purpose of this topic... well, it all made sense considering his backstory and everything else. I mean Scar had destroyed everything Simba knew and loved, not to mention that Simba suddenly had a huge responsibility here... and also, Nala was very adamant that Scar was terrible for the Pride Lands... when the girl you're interested in says "this guy's a jerk, do something about it," most guys (and gals who like gals) do something about it, especially if they have other stakes in it like the well being of their mother and her friends/relatives.

Simba has every reason to act the way he does at the end of the film.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 7:51 am
by BrianGriffinFan
But the way his grammar changes alone is interesting.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 8:01 am
by Carl
Most people's grammar changes as they grow up, and most people don't refer to people as "Uncle so-and-so" as adults either. I call my uncles and aunts by their first names even though that wasn't the case as a kid. Many people go from saying "mom/mommy" and "dad/daddy" to "mother" and "father" as they age too. There's nothing weird about it at all.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 8:19 am
by BrianGriffinFan
Killjoy Dixon wrote:Most people's grammar changes as they grow up, and most people don't refer to people as "Uncle so-and-so" as adults either. I call my uncles and aunts by their first names even though that wasn't the case as a kid. Many people go from saying "mom/mommy" and "dad/daddy" to "mother" and "father" as they age too. There's nothing weird about it at all.


But his grammar as a kid (also like "aw man") helped give the film a relatable feel. When he starts talking differently he feels more like an actor. Espicially the "father" part.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 8:27 am
by Carl
A lot of people talk differently when they grow up, it's not weird to change the way you talk. He doesn't feel like an actor as an adult to me, he feels like someone who's changed... which is what happened. Many adults do not say things like "aw man" in serious situations. The way he talked as a kid made him feel like a kid... the same grammar as an adult would make him seem childish and immature.

Re: Why is Adult Simba more serious?

PostPosted: December 26th, 2015, 2:00 pm
by HereWeStand
Lol.

You're obviously nitpicking about things that just aren't there. You're asking why a tiny and arguably spoiled child doesn't speak the same years after an unresolved traumatic event and complete change of peers and environment which would change ANYONE a lot growing up. Honestly though, you can't be serious because even without that in mind an adult would OBVIOUSLY speak differently than they would when they were kids, it's called maturing and growing up.